A Distant Visitor
2019년 10월 31일
This page isn't available in your language yet, if you'd like to provide a translation please contact us at info@unawe.org

Our solar system is now playing host to a visitor from very far away.

Comet 2I/Borisov is not from our Solar System. In fact, we don’t know where it came from! This comet is only the second object that scientists have observed that has arrived here from another planet system elsewhere in our galaxy.

Comets are made of rock, dust and ice, so they are sometimes called “dirty snowballs”. If they stray too close to the Sun, the heat evaporates some of the comet’s ice. This creates a fantastic “tail” that can be seen as the comet travels across the night sky.

This image was taken from the Hubble Space Telescope of the comet on 12 October 2019.

The comet is travelling toward the Sun and will come the closest to our star in December. Next year it will travel out of our solar system once more, perhaps one day in the distant future it will enter another system. 

The comet is currently travelling at 150 000 kilometres per hour, this is almost 500 times faster than a race car!


This Space Scoop is based on a Press Release from ESA/Hubble


Image credit:
NASA, ESA, D. Jewitt (UCLA)

멋진 사실

On average, only one comet per year can be seen soaring across the sky with the naked eye. If you're very lucky, you might have seen one for yourself, and this picture will look very familiar.

This Space Scoop is based on a Press Release from ESA.
ESA
그림
프린트용
더 많은 Space Scoops

좀 더 알고 싶으세요?

Space Scoop 이란?

천문학 알아보기

다음 세대의 우주 탐험가를 위하여

Space Scoop 친구들

연락처

This website was produced by funding from the European Community's Horizon 2020 Programme under grant agreement n° 638653